7. Career Management Skills, e-guidance and online tools

7. Career Management Skills, e-guidance and online tools

Filter

Language:

The article is based on scientific research based on theoretical basis of social constructivism and machine learning. It draws two main conclusions. One is that social networking data files are more than a digital footprint and that machine learning models can be part of shaping professional identity. Artificial intelligence can contribute to effective career guidance without completing a questionnaire and career guidance based on machine learning.

This paper examines the environment that the web provides for career exploration. Career practitioners have long seen value in engaging in technology and the opportunities offered by the internet, and this interest continues. However, this paper suggests that the online environment for career exploration is far broader than that provided by public-sector careers services. In addition to these services, there is a wide range of other players including private-sector career consultants, employers, recruitment companies and learning providers who are all contributing to a potentially rich career exploration environment.

Proceedings of the use of ICT in the provision of career guidance and examples of good practice. Developed by the Jobtribu.eu project

The document is a research report on availability and use of digital technologies in career guidance and related digital skills development, which aimed to find out what progress has been made over the last nine years in how professionals and managers use digital technologies to deliver career development services such as the potential of digital technologies to provide career development services; and what are the training needs of career development professionals to be able to use digital technologies to deliver services, innovate solutions and solve service delivery problems.

The Guide is an introduction to the concept of online counselling. The Guide focuses on the details of online counselling, the main requirements for career counsellors, online good practice, advice and tips, working with different target groups, and the main challenges of delivering online guidance (such as establishing trust between the counsellor and the client remotely).

The book is a collection of examples on the use of game based learning (GBL) in careers guidance. Whilst the focus of research has been on initiatives within guidance linked to VET, other innovative practices within careers guidance more generally have also been explored, in order to provide a broad picture of the current adoption of GBL within guidance (and so inform the project’s own GBL outputs). The book contains more than 20 best practices from across Europe. The best practices focus on the content and technical aspects of the GBL initiatives, as well as their target audience and the wider sector/policy need they address. Their strengths and weaknesses are also presented. Many of the presented best practices have been developed as part of European-level projects. Among them there are mobile apps and online games, interview simulations, self-assessment and job-exploration tools, and national careers guidance platforms with a wide range of interactive game-based tools.

This research, funded jointly by the UK’s Career Development Institute and the University of Derby, has been conducted at a time of rapid change in the availability and use of digital technologies. For the purposes of this report this is defined as electronic technology that generates, stores, and processes data. A recommendation to develop digital skills to harness technology is not new and was first suggested by The Careers Profession Task Force (2010). This research aims to determine what progress has been made over the last nine years since the recommendation was made and seeks to determine how practitioners and managers use digital technology to deliver career development services; the potential for digital technology to deliver career development services; and the training needs of career development practitioners so that they can use digital technology to deliver services, innovate solutions and solve problems in service delivery.

Despite the great expansion of the Internet and digital technologies, not all potential possibilities of their use in career guidance have yet been revealed. Great potential can be expected from artificial intelligence technologies to gather and analyse career information such as multilevel expert system, machine learning, business intelligence, data mining, etc., and the involvement of artificial intelligence in career guidance tools. Among the career guidance counsellors are also creatives who have proven that career guidance tools and aids can be digitized and use the potential of digital technologies to increase their effectiveness and attractiveness. These career guidance counsellors have a developed "digital mind-set" skill, i.e. they think creatively about the use of digital tools in career guidance and for the development of career management skills (CMS), which belong to the desired, expected, and intended outputs of the career guidance process. The main content of this study is in the second and third chapters. The second chapter provides an overview of career guidance provided online through digital technologies (eguidance), distinguishing whether the service is provided with (Chapter 2.1) or without online support of a career guidance counsellor (Chapter 2.2). Where appropriate, available examples of applications and their use in working with clients in developing career management skills are given. The third chapter summarizes the challenges and risks of using career e-guidance.


This paper examines the environment that the web provides for career exploration. Career practitioners have long seen value in engaging in technology and the opportunities offered by the internet, and this interest continues. However, this paper suggests that the online environment for career exploration is far broader than that provided by public-sector careers services. In addition to these services, there is a wide range of other players including private-sector career consultants, employers, recruitment companies and learning providers who are all contributing to a potentially rich career exploration environment.

This article explores the development of the concept of ‘integrated guidance’ in Norway. Integrated guidance seeks to combine career guidance that is delivered through different modalities (face-to-face, by telephone, online etc.) in such a way that the whole is more than the sum of the parts. Whilst the conception of career guidance as a multi-modal, diverse, but connected, set of interventions is not new (see for example OECD, 2004), current policy support for career guidance in Norway, as well as the country’s high level of digital engagement and adoption, means that it offers fertile ground for the development of new ideas such as integrated guidance. There is a long tradition of the use of online and digital tools in career guidance (Watts, 2002). Such tools offer a number of clear benefits including providing individuals with new opportunities to access career guidance any time from where ever they are and opening up the possibility of new kinds of guidance service (Hooley, Shepherd & Dodd, 2015). They also allow careers providers to manage demand more strategically and potentially to offer more diverse services than would be possible in a single location. Furthermore, there is a growth in client expectations that at least some services will be available digitally, reinforced by the way in which digital technologies have been used to deliver other kinds of services.

This tool is one of the results of the co-operation at EU level within the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN). The ELGPN aims to assist the EU Member States, neighbouring countries and the European Commission in developing European co-operation on lifelong guidance in both the education and the employment sectors. Its purpose is to promote co-operation and systems development at member-country level in implementing the priorities identified in the EU Resolutions on Lifelong Guidance (2004, 2008). The ELGPN is a unique European platform to present, exchange, and discuss the results of lifelong guidance provision in the Member States and neighbouring countries. Likewise it influences related units, working groups and networks for which lifelong guidance is of relevance in order to give an impulse for further development (e.g. schools, the European Network of the Public Employment Services). This co-operation results in products such as Concept Notes and in Tools, like this present tool, to support further deliberations in Member States with their continuous efforts in developing lifelong guidance. They support ELGPN delegates in providing relevant impulses to other networks and working groups, in dissemination, in discussion, in current and in informed development.

This publication is supported by the European Union’s Programme for Employment and Social Solidarity - PROGRESS (2007- 2013). Despite diverging practices, several trends are emerging at European level in the use of ICT in delivering counselling services. We have conducted a Europewide survey in the second half of 2011 inviting organizations that offer counselling services to provide us with examples of practices, initiatives, and policies regarding the use of ICT in counselling. A template for describing the practice was provided, with responses being collected and analyzed. The second part of this publication presents the detailed descriptions received. Policy papers, reviews and statements from stakeholders were also taken in account. In total, about three dozen such examples have been taken into consideration from EU member states and associated countries. They cover individual initiatives and partnerships with a large representation of public and private bodies, research facilities and practitioners’ associations, as well as, career counselling and school counselling institutions.

The report presents the results of the practices review carried out within the ICARD project, aimed at developing a European Career Development Programme for higher education students in Europe. The aim of the study was to investigate methods, formats and topics used by higher education institutions to promote acquisition of self-awareness and career development by students. The extent of the collection and review exercise was limited to contribution to the purpose of design: although not representing a full comparative analysis on how higher education institutions deal with the issue, it includes analysis of 88 practices from 23 countries (22 European, 1 Australian).  The extent of the collection and review exercise was limited to contribute to the purpose of design: this document does not represent a full comparative analysis on how higher education institutions deal with the issue. However, examples and descriptions were collected from 22 countries of Europe and one outside Europe, offering therefore a meaningful overview about running practices to foster acquisition of career skills.

A System and method for providing a user with information to enhance the user's learning and development. It includes the server means connected to a communications net work and the various processing terminals used by a user and connected to the communications network either directly or through a mobile communications network. A computer program Stored in a memory of the Server Searches information Sources for the information, wherein the information Sources are linked to the communications network and wherein the information is relevant to the user based on a personal profile of the user. The System also includes a user electronic Storage means, Such as a personalised website, to which the information is for warded for presentation to and accessibility by the user.

The Internet, digital technologies and social networks are becoming the primary means of interaction between people. They allow not only communication but also the acquisition of certain skills and during each other interaction to a certain extent can also lead to the formation of professional identityAmong the career counselors are also creatives who have shown that counseling tools and convert tools into digital form and use the potential of digital technologies to enhance their effectiveness and attractiveness. These career counselors have a developed "digital mind set" skill, ie they think creatively about the use of digital tools in career counseling and development. The main content of this study is in the second and third chapters. The second chapter provides an overview career guidance provided online via digital technologies (e-advice), distinguishing between whether it is an online support service career counselor or without it. Where appropriate, they are listed available examples of applications and their use in working with clients in developing skills career management. The third chapter summarizes the challenges and risks of using career e-counseling.

Different EU documents, including the 2012 Council Recommendation on validation of non-formal and informal learning and the 2016 Council Recommendation on Upskilling Pathways, promote skills audits as one means to support individuals in their transition periods. In these documents skills audits are suggested as a practice to identify and document knowledge, skills and competence of individuals with a view to further inform decisions about career orientation, education or training. However, there is limited evidence about the extent to which skills audits are used and what they entail in practice. The purpose of this study was to improve the knowledge base about skills audits, to identify main types of skills audits, the methods and approaches used for skills audits as well as to assess the extent to which standards are used as part of the process. Considerations about effectiveness of skills audits were also analysed.

The New Skills Agenda for an Inclusive and Competitive Europe states that education and training need to go beyond the immediate needs of the labour market and focus on a “longer term objective of developing the flexible mind-set and curiosity needed to adapt and acquire the new, as yet unidentifiable, knowledge, skills and competences that will be needed to steer the technological development of the future”.FUTURE TIME TRAVELLER aims to transform the career guidance offered to Generation Z by introducing an innovative, games-based scenario approach to preparing the next generation for the jobs of the future. Throughout their learning journey, users will complete various missions, which will require them to be proactive, think critically and creatively, solve problems and make decisions. Thus, FUTURE TIME TRAVELLER will help young people develop and practice a wide range of 21st Century career management skills, something which will enhance their employability long[1]term and so help them to develop into active members of society.

EU Member States aspire to develop more comprehensive lifelong guidance systems but are often hampered by contextual and other issues in how to approach professionalisation (Barnes et al., 2020). New dynamics in the development of ICT-driven ecosystems, at European level and within countries, play a greater role in shaping training policy and competence profiles. Professionalising career guidance is seen as one of the key principles for assuring quality in guidance services (Barnes et al., 2020; Cedefop, 2009, 2020; Ertelt and Kraatz, 2011; ETF, 2020). A continuously professionalising workforce can facilitate the functioning of education and training systems, including initial and continuing vocational education and training (Cedefop and ETF, 2020). High-quality services can enable individuals to secure sustainable and relevant employment according to their competences and strengths, as well their aspirations, plans and potential. Support and incentives to careers and learning can smooth career pathways.

No elements of this type available

No elements of this type available

Logo Project

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Project Number 612881-EPP-1-2019-1-IT-EPPKA3-PI-FORWARD