5. Career Management Skills and other competences frameworks

5. Career Management Skills and other competences frameworks

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Blueprint for Careers for England. 

The Blueprint sets out an approach to the management of life, learning and work that will support individuals to make the most of their opportunities and deal with the challenges of the 21st century. It outlines eleven key areas in which individuals may focus their energy and enhance their ability to achieve what is right for them as they navigate their way forward.

The development of the entrepreneurial capacity of European citizens and organisations has been one of the key policy objectives for the EU and Member States for many years. There is a growing awareness that entrepreneurial skills, knowledge and attitudes can be learned and in turn lead to the widespread development of entrepreneurial mind-sets and culture, which benefit individuals and society as a whole. The development of the entrepreneurial capacity of European citizens and organisations has been one of the key policy objectives for the EU and Member States for many years. There is a growing awareness that entrepreneurial skills, knowledge and attitudes can be learned and in turn lead to the widespread development of entrepreneurial mind-sets and culture, which benefit individuals and society as a whole. In this context, the Entrepreneurship Competence study (EntreComp) was launched by the JRC on behalf of the Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion (DG EMPL) in January 2015. One of the key objectives of EntreComp was to develop a common conceptual approach, which could support the development of entrepreneurship competence at European level.

The European Digital Competence Framework for Citizens, also known as DigComp, offers a tool to improve citizens’ digital competence. DigComp was developed by the JRC as a scientific project and with intensive consultation of stakeholders, initially on behalf of DG EAC and, more recently, on behalf of DG EMPL. First published in 2013, DigComp has become a reference for the development and strategic planning of digital competence initiatives both at European and Member State level. In June 2016 JRC published DigComp 2.0, updating the terminology and conceptual model, as well as showcasing examples of its implementation at the European, national and regional level. The current version is labelled DigComp 2.1 and it focuses on expanding the initial three proficiency levels to a more fine-grained eight level description as well as providing examples of use for these eight levels. Its aim is to support stakeholders with the further implementation of DigComp.

The central goal of this handbook is to provide (future) managers, programme leaders and lecturers with common points of reference (CPR) for setting up and developing degree programmes in our field. The central focus of this handbook is the academic training of CGC professionals. CPR offer orientation and enable a higher degree of cooperation, while not inhibiting the autonomy of the different parties. The added value of a system of CPR is high – not only for the academic community, but also for our stakeholders. In particular, we hope to support the development of the emerging profession of career guidance and counselling through our efforts to develop our academic discipline and higher education in our subject

With the 2018 European Recommendation on Key Competences, the Personal, Social and Learning to Learn Competence has been acknowledged as one of the eight Key Competences for Lifelong Learning by the European Union. This key competence integrates the Learning to Learn Key competence as described in the previous 2006 Recommendation, with a wider scope on personal and social development. It is a transversal key competence which is intertwined with other key competences (e.g. citizenship, digital, entrepreneurship, languages, STEM competences), functioning as a crucial enabler for their development. It spans relevant skills which should be acquired by all citizens, to ensure active participation in the society and the economy. Moreover, it takes into account the increasing importance of non-cognitive, soft skills in fastchanging global contexts - those distinctive human skills that cannot be easily taken over by Artificial Intelligence. This report contributes to the projects Learning and Living in the Digital Age 1 and 2, launched by the Human Capital and Employment Unit at JRC Seville, 3 on behalf of DG Education and Culture. Both projects contain workpackages on the Personal, Social and Learning to Learn Competence, with the aim of contributing to the better understanding and development of this Key Competence in Europe.

Career Management Skills (CMS) are very important as they enable people to manage their own life paths in education, training and work during lifespan. The acquisition of CMS represents a key objective of the lifelong guidance (which refers to a range of activities having the aim to support people either individually or collectively to manage their own career). These activities can be delivered by education and training organizations, public employment services, community organizations. In addressing Europe 2020 targets, the development of the CMS of citizens is a critical tool for employment, education and training, youth and social policies (European Commission, 2011). An extensive research base provides evidence for the impact of lifelong guidance in the sectors of schools, vocational education and training (VET), higher education (HE), adult education, employment and social inclusion. (Hooley,2014). Advice and information on the development of policies and systems for lifelong guidance, including CMS in each sector and across sectors are provided in the ELGPN Tool No. 6: Guidelines for Policies and Systems Development for Lifelong Guidance: A Reference Framework for the EU and for the Commission, which also includes examples of ‘good practice’ (ELGPN, 2015).

The OECD Learning Compass 2030 sets out a “learning framework”, not an “assessment framework”. The framework offers a broad vision of the types of competencies students need to thrive in 2030, as opposed to what kind of competencies should be measured or can be measured. While it is often said that “what gets measured gets treasured”, this learning framework allows for what cannot be measured (at least, for the time being) to be treasured. The OECD Learning Compass 2030 recognises the intrinsic value of learning by elaborating a wide range and types of learning within a broad structure. At the same time, assessment initiatives can use the learning framework to help focus discussions on what kinds of learning could be prioritised in particular contexts, for example for the purpose of monitoring and supporting student progress. The OECD Learning Compass 2030 is not a “curriculum framework” either. It acknowledges the importance of formal, non-formal and informal learning alongside education that is bounded by formal curricula and instructional strategies. Moving towards 2030, it is increasingly important to recognise the multiple layers and directions of learning in which students participate, including at school, at home and in the communities to which they belong.

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