2. Career Management Skills frameworks in the world

2. Career Management Skills frameworks in the world

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This article examines the Blueprint framework for career management skills as it has been revealed across sequential implementations in the USA, Canada and Australia. It is argued that despite its lack of an empirical basis, the framework forms a useful and innovative means through which career theory, practice and policy can be connected. The framework comprises both core elements (learning areas, learning model and levels) and contextual elements (resources, community of practice, service delivery approach and policy connection). Each of these elements is explored.

This framework presents learning outcome statements for students across seventeen important areas of careers, employability and enterprise learning. These statements show progression from Key Stage 2 through to post-16 education and training. It also offers examples of suggested activities that will help students to achieve the learning outcomes. The framework is a practical resource which can be interpreted flexibly by schools and colleges according to the particular needs of their learners. The structure builds on the ACEG Framework for careers and work-related education (CDI, 2012) so that there is continuity for practitioners and partners. It has, however, been updated to reflect key national policy developments in relation to the careers and inspiration agenda.

Strategy of Career Guidance and Counselling in the Republic of Serbia establishes the system of career guidance and counselling in the Republic of Serbia. The recommendations contained in this document are based on the already initiated activities of modernization and improvement of vocational education and training, adult education and reform processes in the field of employment. This Strategy is a direct result of National Employment Strategy of Serbia, Strategy for VET development in the Republic of Serbia, Strategy for Adult Education, and National Youth Strategy and the Action Plan for Implementation of the National Youth Strategy for the period 2009-2014, enacted by the Government of the Republic of Serbia.

The development of any person's career takes place over most of his/her lifetime. The purpose of this statement is to describe and define the nature of and the need for career development through a series of National Career Development Association (NCDA) policy statements with respect to various life stages. The development of any person's career takes place over most of his/her lifetime. The purpose of this statement is to describe and define the nature of and the need for career development through a series of National Career Development Association (NCDA) policy statements with respect to various life stages. The purposes of this document are to: (a) formulate a basis for official actions taken by the NCDA Board of Directors, (b) serve as a rationale for various official NCDA positions taken by the NCDA Board of Directors, (c) serve as a basis for revision and/or extension of NCDA policies on the part of the NCDA Board of Directors, (d) serve as a basis for revision of NCDA three-year plans and annual plans, (e) serve as a basis for revisions and/or extension of NCDA policies on the part of individual NCDA members, and (f) serve as a stimulus to greatly increase the emphasis on career development in counselor education programs. As such, this document is viewed as only the first of many steps to be taken in the formulation of a set of NCDA policies that truly represent the members of NCDA.

Careers work is no longer just about finding a quick fix solution to learners’ needs at different career decision points. It is about equipping them for lifelong career well-being and happiness. Learners in FE need to continue developing the career understanding and skills that will help them to succeed in learning and work throughout their lives. This guide is about the Blueprint framework of career development competencies, which can be used by learners of all ages to help them understand themselves, explore opportunities and manage their careers. Blueprint originated in Canada over 20 years ago and is kept up to date through initiatives and international partnerships involving agencies in the USA, Canada and Australia.

The Australian Blueprint for Career Development is the product of an international partnership between a coalition of Canadian agencies lead by the National Life/Work Centre (NLWC), the Canadian Career Information Partnership (CCIP), Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and the National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) in the United States. Through their willingness to extend this international partnership to include Australia, 15 years’ work in Canada and the USA was built upon in the initial development of the Australian prototype, when Miles Morgan was commissioned by the Ministerial Council for Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA) to develop the Australian Blueprint for Career Development in 2003.

This article examines the Blueprint framework for career management skills as it has been revealed across sequential implementations in the USA, Canada and Australia. It is argued that despite its lack of an empirical basis, the framework forms a useful and innovative means through which career theory, practice and policy can be connected. The framework comprises both core elements (learning areas, learning model and levels) and contextual elements (resources, community of practice, service delivery approach and policy connection). Each of these elements is explored.

The purpose of the study visit was to examine the Canadian career development system and particularly to look at the implementation and influence of a career management skills framework called the Blueprint for Life/Work Design. Canada was identified because it has a strong tradition of career development and because it was somewhere that I had already built up some contacts. Canada also provides an Tristram Hooley, Career Development in Canada interesting comparator to the UK as it offers considerable similarities (language, culture, history) and dramatic differences (geography, climate, labour market). Given this I hoped that the study visit would provide learning and insights about career development in Canada both in its own right and as a comparator to the UK.

The purpose of drafting this Strategy is to identify the priorities, measures and activities in establishing the LCG system and to serve as the basis for providing citizens access to high quality LCG services so that they can develop their careers throughout their lives in accordance with their capacities, interests, personality traits and labour market needs. This document is an important basis for the use of EU funds as an aid in the development of the system and the provision of services falling within defined competences.

This paper provides a detailed overview of education and work in Denmark. The topic of education and work is a compulsory one in Danish primary and lower secondary school from preschool class to grade 9. Teaching of the topic is divided into three levels: pre-school class-grade 3, grades 4-6, and grades 7-9. An individual timetable is not imposed on the three compulsory themes, but is integrated into the teaching of compulsory subjects. It is up to the school principal to decide which subjects will incorporate the compulsory themes.

The Framework is intended to be a resource to support schools in meeting the requirement of The Education Act (1998) that schools provide students with “access to appropriate guidance to assist them in their educational and career choices” (section 9c). It is envisaged that the Framework will support schools in planning and delivering a comprehensive whole school guidance programme that meets the needs of all students. Schools may also find it helpful, in informing guidance provision, to consult the Framework for Junior Cycle (DES, 2015a) in relation to ‘other learning experiences’ and Wellbeing (see DES 2017a). Guidance-related learning is identified in the Junior Cycle Wellbeing Guidelines as one of the main pillars of a school’s Wellbeing programme (NCCA, 2017).

The Framework aims to take forward the ambitions set out within "Skills for Scotland A Lifelong Skills Strategy (2007) and the subsequent Skill Strategy Refresh (2010) and to build on the firm foundations of skills for young people established within Curriculum for Excellence. Curriculum for Excellence takes a fresh approach to what, how and where young people learn. It aims to raise standards, improve knowledge and develop skills equipping young people with the confidence to give them a competitive edge in a global job market. The development of skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work, are embedded within Curriculum for Excellence and are the entitlement of all children and young people.

Developing the Young Workforce – Scotland’s Youth Employment Strategy was published in December 2014. This strategy and implementation plan is the Government’s response to Education Working for All! and sets out milestones over a seven-year period with the aim of improving outcomes for all young people by 2021. Milestones which relate directly to the development of a career education standard for 2015/16 include:

• agreed standard for careers guidance for all young people including those who require additional help and support is in place;
• guidance and support developed by Education Scotland and Skills Development Scotland (SDS) for teachers and practitioners to support young people in S3 to learn about finding, applying and getting a job;
• guidance and support developed by Education Scotland and SDS for teachers and practitioners on the world of work aimed at ages 3-18; and
• engagement with young people, teachers and practitioners, parents/carers and employers to actively promote the range of options available.

This is one of a suite of learning resources which provides support to develop practice related to the Career Education Standard (CES). This resource, ‘Introduction to Career Management Skills’ (CMS), helps to familiarize yourself with CMS and how this can be used to support learning and career education. It is structured to begin to inform and to help you reflect on your existing practice.

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https://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/what-we-do/scotlands-careers-services/career-management-skills-explained/

https://www.yourcareer.gov.au/get-career-resources/australian-blueprint-for-career-development

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPS2E4MtX3w

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